The Value of Hawai‘i

News: News

Land and Development for Koolaupoko: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future

Monday, April 18th, 6:00-7:30 pm

Land and Development for Ko‘olaupoko: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future
Windward Community College
Akoakoa Room #105

Join us for a panel discussion with business, cultural, preservation, agricultural, and civic leaders who will share their perspectives on and real experiences in the history of land development on the Windward side, and discuss together as a community some of the current development debates, including those surrounding Lā‘ie. This event is based on the idea that we must know the past in order to make the best decisions for our shared future in Ko‘olaupoko.

All are welcome to attend.
Moderated by The Hawai‘i Independent online news [http://thehawaiiindependent.com].
For more information, see http://thevalueofhawaii.com or call 808-358-0871.

Sponsored by The Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, The Hawaii Independent, and The Center for Biographical Research. This event is made possible with generous support from Windward Community College.

Speaker Bios:

Alice P. Hewett is the current president of the Ko‘olaupoko Hawaiian Civic Club and has spent over forty years working with Police Activities League (PAL) and youth athletics in the Kāne‘ohe area. She is a kupa ‘āina (grassroots) resident of Kāne‘ohe and the mother of Kumu Hula Frank Hewett.

Leialoha “Rocky” Kaluhiwa, vice-president of the Ko‘olaupoko Hawaiian Civic Club, has spent most of her life as a community advocate, most notably working to preserve the rural lands of Ko‘olaupoko for agriculture and open space. A longtime member of the Kahalu‘u Neighborhood Board, she also monitors and advocates for protecting Kāne‘ohe Bay.

Herb Lee, Jr. has long been involved with organizations that protect and preserve environment resources, culture, and the arts. He is the president of Lee Communications, Inc. since 1988, founder of the Waikalua Loko Fishpond Preservation Society in 1995, president of Aloha First International, and past president of the Kaneohe Business Group and Kaneohe Rotary Club. He is current chair of the Pohai Nani Advisory Board since 2000, and since 2005, executive director of the Pacific American Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to help improve the lives of all Pacific Islanders. Herb is also a professional musician, songwriter, and recording artist.

Davianna Pōmaika‘i McGregor is a Professor and founding member of Ethnic Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Dr. McGregor is a historian of Hawai‘i and the Pacific. She lives in Kaiwi‘ula, O‘ahu and Ho‘olehua, Moloka‘i, and helps steward Kanaloa Kaho‘olawe as a member of the Protect Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana. Her book, Nā Kua‘āina: Living Hawaiian Culture (U of Hawai‘i P, 2007) focuses on Hawaiian cultural customs, beliefs, and practices in cultural kīpuka.

John Reppun is the director of KEY Project in Kahalu‘u [keyproject.org]

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Link to Price/Value of Hawaii Debate and Legislature Report Card Events

If you missed our great debate last Monday between contributors from The Price of Paradise and The Value of Hawai’i, our sponsors at Civil Beat have made the video available online at this address:

http://www.civilbeat.com/posts/2011/02/28/9322-live-event-knowing-hawaiis-past-shaping-its-future/

Below, please find some information about our March events focusing on our current state legislature, and please feel free to forward this information to anyone you think might be interested.
We look forward to seeing you and hearing from you at more public discussions on the value of Hawai’i and the value of community dialogue.

The Value of Hawai‘i:  Hawai‘i State Legislature Report Card, Part 1 and 2

Wednesday, March 16 and 23, 2011

5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center

Ali‘iōlani Hale, 417 S. King Street

Part 1: A midterm report card and public discussion of the State Legislature commenting on prisons, labor and human trafficking, law, and national and state legislative decisions and trends.  Featuring experts in media/journalism, political activism, and law: Kat Brady (Coordinator of Community Alliance on Prisons), Margery Bronster (Lawyer and former Attorney General), Lowell Chun-Hoon (Honolulu labor lawyer and co-founder of the Amerasia Journal), and David Shapiro (Reporter, editor, and columnist for the Star Advertiser).

Part 2:  A midterm report card and public discussion of the State Legislature commenting on the environment, the role of government and media, Hawaiian history and law, and civil unions.  Featuring experts in media/journalism, political activism, and law:  Steven H. Levinson (former Associate Justice of the Hawai‘i Supreme Court), Beth-Ann Kozlovich (Hawai‘i Public Radio’s Talk Shows Executive Producer and creator of the Town Square program on HPR), Jon Osorio (Professor of Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa), and Patricia Tummons (a career journalist writing for Environment Hawai‘i since 1990).

Light refreshments served.  RSVP to 539-4999 or by email to toni@jhchawaii.net by March 15.
Sponsored by The Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, The Hawaii Independent, and The Center for Biographical Research.

The Hawaii State Judiciary does not warrant the accuracy of the information provided by the speakers. Any views, opinions, or statements expressed are solely those of the speaker and do not necessarily represent the views of the Judiciary.

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Monday 2/28 come talk with Authors from The Price of Paradise and The Value of Hawaii

The Price of Paradise and The Value of Hawai‘i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future

Monday, Feb. 28, 3:00-4:30 pm
Art Auditorium, UH Manoa campus
Free and open to the public

Join us for a lively and challenging debate and comparison of the influential The Price of Paradise publications (1992, 1993) and the more recent The Value of Hawai‘i (2010), two essay projects that offer a range of timely and sobering analysis on issues ranging from the economy to the environment, education to cultural preservation, the government, social services, and more.

What motivated each publication, and what has changed in the past two decades? What do we value about our home, and what prices have we all paid/are willing to pay to continue to live here? Speakers will comment generally on the state and State of Hawai‘i as they see it at the moment, and in particular, what they think the future holds, or should hold, for this to be a better place.

Featuring authors from both books: David Callies, Randall Roth, Susan Chandler, Deane Neubauer, and Jon Osorio.
Books will be available for sale through UH Press.

Moderated by Civil Beat Associate Editor Sara Lin, and livestreamed at http://www.civilbeat.com.
NEW: For brief remarks by the speakers on changes to Hawai‘i over the past 18 years, go to the following link on Civil Beat.
http://www.civilbeat.com/articles/2011/02/21/9134-knowing-the-past-shaping-the-future/

Co-sponsored by Civil Beat, The Center for Biographical Research, and Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities.

Speaker bios:

David Callies is the Kudo Professor of Law at William S. Richardson Law School, University of Hawai‘i. He is national co-editor (with Tarlock), of the Land Use and Environmental Law Review. The second edition of his Hawai‘i land use book, Regulating Paradise:  Land Use Controls in Hawaii, was published in 2010 by the University of Hawai‘i Press. He was awarded a University of Hawai‘i Regents Medal for Excellence in Teaching in 2009.

Susan M. Chandler is the Director of the College of Social Sciences Public Policy Center and a Professor of Public Administration at the University of Hawai‘i at M noa. She teaches in the areas of public policy, network governance, community and organi­zational change, and policy implementation. From 1995 to 2002 she served in Governor Benjamin J. Cayetano’s administration as the Director of Human Services. She recently completed a book with Richard Pratt, Backstage in the Bureaucracy: Politics and Public Services (U of Hawai‘i P, 2010).

Deane Neubauer is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of Hawai‘i at M noa. He also currently serves as Senior Consultant to the International Forum for Education 2020 Program of the East-West Center, and as Senior Research Fellow for the Globalization Research Center, UHM. His research focus is on policy and globalization, with particular interests in health and educational policy.

Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio, PhD, is Professor of Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at M noa, a historian of the Hawaiian Kingdom, and a practicing musician and composer. He has been an advo­cate for the restoration of Hawai‘i’s political independence, and writes about the sovereignty movement in Hawai‘i. He and his wife Mary live in P lolo, and have sent all of their children to public schools and Kamehameha High School.

Randall Roth has been a member of the faculty at three law schools and was named Professor of the Year at all three. In 2000 the Honolulu Star-Bulletin included Roth on  its list of “100 Individuals Who Made a Difference in Hawai’i during the 20th century” and in 2005 the City of Honolulu’s Centennial Commission put Roth on  its list of “100 Who Made Lasting Contributions During Honolulu’s First 100 Years.”  In 2009 Morehouse College presented Roth with the Gandhi, King, Ikeda award for pursuit of social justice by non-violent means.

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Social Services in Hawaii (Thur, 2/10)

Two chances to discuss social services in Hawai’i this Thursday, 2/10/2011–

“Social Service: Back (and Front) Stage in a Life of Advocacy”

Thursday, February 10, 2011 • 12 noon – 1:15 pm
Center for Biographical Research • 1800 East West Road, Henke Hall 325

How does one become an advocate in the field of social services?
Education? Family background? Work and volunteer experience?

Susan Chandler
has worked at the University of Hawai‘i since 1976, first at the School of Social Work and currently as the Director of the Social Sciences Public Policy Center and Professor of Public Administration. She teaches and conducts research in the areas of public policy analysis, organizational change, policy implementation, collaborative governance, public-private partnerships, and public administration. She is faculty advisor for students entering the Graduate Certificate in Public Policy program, and chair of the University’s Institutional Review Board. In 1999, she received the Robert W. Clopton Award for Distinguished Community Service; her advocacy work currently includes serving as Policy Committee Chair and Board Member of PHOCUSED.

She took eight years off to serve in the Benjamin Cayetano Administration as the Director of Human Services, and in a new release from the University of Hawai‘i Press, Backstage in a Bureaucracy: Politics and Public Service, she candidly tells what it’s like to be in charge of a large public bureaucracy—from the hiring process to her efforts to bring about change, to the challenges and rewards of public service.

For more information, please contact the Center for Biographical Research at 956-3774 or biograph@hawaii.edu

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Panel on Social Services in Hawai‘i

Thursday, Feb. 10, 7:00-8:30 pm

Chaminade University, Ching Conference Center, Eiben Hall (2nd floor)

Free, and free parking.

Come and discuss the history and current state of programs that are designed to assist us with housing, income, job training, healthcare, childcare, violence protection, and other services. What should the balance be between the public and private sectors? What is the status of these services under our new governor and Legislature?

“Now we are seeing increasing social problems all around us. . . .[Homeless] shelters are full. The community food banks are experiencing big increases in demand even while the Food Stamp rolls are growing at an alarming rate—18 percent in the last two years. Unemployment is high, family violence is increasing, and Medicaid is going broke. . . .” From “Social Services” by Susan Chandler in The Value of Hawai‘i.

Speaker bios:
Susan M. Chandler is Director of the College of Social Sciences Public Policy Center and a Professor of Public Administration at the University of Hawai’i. She has served as Director of Human Services for the State of Hawai’i. Her most recent publication with Richard Pratt is Backstage in the Bureaucracy: Politics and Public Service

Suzanne N.J. Chun Oakland is a member of the Hawaii Senate, representing the 13th District since 1996. Previously she was a member of the Hawaii House of Representatives from 1991 through 1996. She currently serves as Chair of the Senate’s Human Services and Public Housing Committee.

Collin Lau, professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, teaches Criminal and Constitutional Law as well as Criminal Justice Ethics. A lifelong Hawai‘i resident, he was worked in both government and the community.

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Looking towards 2011 Legislative Session

Aloha kakou and thank you for visiting our site, reading our book, and/or being interested in discussing and taking action on some of the important issues outlined in The Value of Hawai’i. We’ve had an event-full year, full of dozen of discussion and educational events for a wide range of communities across the state. Check out our event calendar or home page for more information about the next few panel discussion events coming up at Chaminade University, one on Dec. 9 on Hawai’i prisons and the next on Jan. 13 on our public education system.

We are looking forward to more events, more discussion, and more community action next year, 2011, and also looking forward to playing an energetic role in the 2011 Legislative session. As citizens of Hawaii, what legislative issues are important to you, and what do you expect and want from our government leaders? We’d love to hear your thoughts, please email us at contact@thevalueofhawaii.com

We’re also proud to report that this book has been a successful teaching tool in a number of classrooms in public high schools and at the university level. We’d like to expand our teaching resource section on this website to help other teachers interested in using the book to start discussions about current events, our government, history, and the issues that matter to us. If you have any suggestions or feedback to share about using the book as a teaching tool, please let us know (again, at contact@thevalueofhawaii.com), and our thanks in advance for sharing your ideas and helping these discussions continue.

Finally, if you have any ideas for events for 2011 that we can help with, please tell us! We are fortunate to have such a great group of smart, articulate authors who are committed to being available for speaking at various places throughout the year. If you have an interest in a particular issue, or are interested in brainstorming ideas, let’s make it happen.

me ke aloha no–

The Value of Hawai’i Editors

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(10/26) Energy and Water (10/28) The Land, Preservation, Politics, and Health

TUESDAY, OCT 26

Public Discussion on Energy and Water
5:30 – 7:00 pm
At Civil Beat offices, Kaimuki Plaza, 3465 Waialae Ave #200, Honolulu, HI 96816 (the Central Pacific Bank Building)
For more information, see http://www.civilbeat.com/info/beatups/

Sustainability is one of the most talked-about words all across the country. For Hawai’i as an island state, what would it mean for us to be energy and water sustainable? How does our plantation history affect the way water is dealt with today? What particular challenges do we face, and how are we dealing with them? What is your individual responsibility to our environment, and what can we do right now?

Come for a public discussion of these important issues, and the event will also be livestreamed on civilbeat.com/info/beatups for those on other islands or elsewhere.

Featuring Henry Curtis and D. Kapua’ala Sproat. Free excerpts of these essays are available online.

This event is free and open to the public, but requires an RSVP to our hosts at Civil Beat. Please RSVP to beatup@civilbeat.com

THURSDAY, OCT 28
The Value of Hawai’i Teach-In Series: Ka Aina: The Land, Preservation, Politics, and Health.
12 noon to 1:10 pm
Kuykendall 410, UH Manoa

We wanted to create a special event series for students, faculty, and other members of the UH Manoa community to meet and talk with contributors from The Value of Hawai’i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future, the most-talked-about local book this year. Nearly all our contributors have agreed to participate in this 5-week Teach-In series, co-sponsored by the UHM Chancellor’s Office. This is an excellent opportunity if you are reading or teaching the book to come down and ask questions of the authors.

This week’s topics will center on the land, preservation, politics, and health. Who controls the fresh water in Hawai’i and why should we care? Can we really harness wind and sea power to power our cities? What does “sovereignty” mean, and what are some ways sovereignty can be enacted right now, in terms of education, land, and other issues? How has Hawai’i’s healthcare systems and policies set itself apart from the rest of the U.S., and where are the current budget cuts happening? How is cultural and historic preservation impacted by land development via construction and tourism, and how is it connected with the Kingdom of Hawai’i? How is the health of our land related to the health of our people?

Featuring Henry Curtis (Life of the Land), Sara Collins (Historic Preservation), Dana Naone Hall (Cultural and Historic Preservation and Politics), Deane Neubauer (Political Science, UHM), and D. Kapua’ala Sproat (Ka Huli Ao William S. Richardson School of Law).

Bring your questions and thoughts with your brownbag lunch, and our contributors will be more than happy to listen and talk with you. And please come early for seats, these sessions have been very well attended.

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(10/25) Hawaiian Law and the State: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future

Hawaiian Law and the State: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future
Mon, Oct. 25, Judiciary History Center
, 5:30 – 7:00 pm
Featuring Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio, Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie, and Lowell Chun-Hoon.
Free and open to the public


Contributors from The Value of Hawai’i come together to discuss the history and future of law, government, the Kingdom of Hawai’i, and statehood, focusing on the connections between Kingdom law, labor law, and today’s state. What lessons does the Kingdom law experience offer for Hawai‘i’s future? What suggestions can we offer for the 2011 Legislative session?

TO RSVP, go to: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=dhymz5cab&oeidk=a07e32gniw4e00bd474&oseq=a012lg28apwaj

SPEAKER BIOS:

Lowell Chun-Hoon is a Honolulu labor lawyer who co-founded and edited the Amerasia Journal at the UCLA Asian American Studies Center. He serves on the boards of the Legal Aid Society of Hawaii, Pacific Survivor Center, and the Kuan Yin Temple, and the advisory committee to the Hawaii Immigrant Justice Center at LASH. At present he is also assisting a group publishing a biography of former Associate Justice Edward H. Nakamura that has been written by Tom Coffman.

Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie is an Associate Professor and Director of Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law, William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. After serving as a law clerk to Hawai‘i Supreme Court Chief Justice William S. Richardson, she joined the staff of the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, a public interest law firm advancing Native Hawaiian rights. Prof. MacKenzie is chief editor for the second edition of the Native Hawaiian Rights Handbook, and has litigated cases dealing with Hawaiian lands, asserting traditional and customary rights, and defending the constitutionality of Hawaiian programs.

Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio, PhD, is Professor of Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, a historian of the Hawaiian Kingdom, and a practicing musician and composer. He has been an advocate for the restoration of Hawai‘i’s political independence, and writes about the sovereignty movement in Hawai‘i. He and his wife Mary live in Pālolo, and have sent all of their children to public schools and Kamehameha High School.

An event sponsored by The Hawai’i Independent [http://thehawaiiindependent.com], The Hawai’i Council for the Humanities, and the Center for Biographical Research.

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Teach-In 10/21 on The Arts, Homelessness, Race, and Agriculture

Dear Friends,

We hope you can help us get the word out about this event by forwarding this to your friends, colleagues, students, and other people you think may be interested in attending. Thank you!

me ke aloha,
Aiko

Announcement:

THURSDAY, OCT 21
The Value of Hawai’i Teach-In Series: Ka Nohona: The Arts, Homelessness, Race, and Agriculture
12 noon to 1:10 pm
Kuykendall 410, UH Manoa

We wanted to create a special event series for students, faculty, and other members of the UH Manoa community to meet and talk with contributors from The Value of Hawai’i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future, the most-talked-about local book this year. Nearly all our contributors have agreed to participate in this 5-week Teach-In series, co-sponsored by the UHM Chancellor’s Office. This is an excellent opportunity if you are reading or teaching the book to come down and ask questions of the authors.

This week’s topics will center on the ways of life via the arts, homelessness, race, and agriculture. Why are the arts undervalued, and what responsibilities do artists have to society? How is homelessness a cultural and colonial problem, and how can the framework of family help us think about this? Why are race relations in Hawai’i so important, and what else it at stake besides the usual haole vs. local? Sustainability is a very trendy topic right now–but what would it mean for Hawai’i to really be food-sustainable? What are we sustaining?

Featuring Marilyn Cristofori (Hawai’i Arts Alliance), John P. Rosa (History), Charles Reppun (Waiahole Farms), and Trisha Kehaulani Watson (Honua Consulting).

Bring your questions and thoughts with your brownbag lunch, and our contributors will be more than happy to listen and talk with you. And please come early for seats, these sessions have been very well attended.

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Events for the week of Oct 11-16

Aloha kakou,

Thank you for your interest in this important book and series of community discussion events. Here is the calendar for this coming week, and for more information, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us, on facebook or email.

The Value of Hawai’i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future

Event list for the week of October 11-16, 2010

MONDAY, OCT 11

Free excerpt of “Climate Change” by Chip Fletcher, Professor at UHM Dept of Geology and Geophysics. This essay discusses a wide range of important environmental issues that are too easy to overlook, including global warming, rising sea levels, and changing rainfall.

You can find the excerpt starting Monday on www.civilbeat.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT 13

5:30 – 7:00 pm

At Civil Beat offices, Kaimuki Plaza, 3465 Waialae Ave #200, Honolulu, HI 96816 (the Central Pacific Bank Building)
For more information, see http://www.civilbeat.com/info/beatups/

Public discussion on Public Education, The University of Hawai’i, and Prisons. Join us for a discussion of furloughs, UH administration, and the meaning and cost of “public” education. In Hawai’i and across the U.S., spending on prisons keeps growing while spending on education continues to be cut. How are these two bottom lines connected? Featuring Kat Brady, Meda Chesney-Lind, Mari Matsuda, and Neal Milner.

*This event is free and open to the public, but requires an RSVP to our hosts at Civil Beat. Please RSVP to beatup@civilbeat.com

THURSDAY, OCT 14

12 noon to 1:10 pm

Kuykendall 410, UH Manoa

The Value of Hawai’i Teach-In Series: Ke Aupuni: Government, Prisons, Law, and Public Education

We wanted to create a special event series for students, faculty, and other members of the UH Manoa community to meet and talk with contributors from The Value of Hawai’i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future. Nearly all our contributors have agreed to participate in this 5-week Teach-In series, co-sponsored by the UHM Chancellor’s Office. This is an excellent opportunity if you are reading or teaching the book to come down and ask questions of the authors.

This week’s topics will center on state government, prisons, Hawaiian law, public education, and the community of UH Manoa itself. Why are so many of our political and educational leaders the focus of public ridicule? What are the connections between prison and education budgets? Will Native Hawaiians ever find reconciliation with the U.S. through law?

Featuring Chad Blair (Journalist), Kat Brady (Community Alliance on Prisons), Meda Chesney-Lind (Women’s Studies), Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie (Ka Huli Ao, William S. Richardson School of Law), Mari Matsuda (William S. Richardson School of Law), and Neal Milner (Political Science).

Bring your questions and thoughts with your brownbag lunch, and our contributors will be more than happy to listen and talk with you. And please come early for seats, these sessions have been very well attended.

THURSDAY, OCT 14

7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Chaminade University, Ching Conference Center, Eiben Hall, Second Floor

3140 Waialae Ave., Honolulu.

Chaminade University presents “Domestic Violence,” the second panel discussion in a series about the book “The Value of Hawaii — Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future,” featuring Susan Hippensteele, Marguerite Simson, and Joe Allen. What are the particular challenges victims of domestic violence face in Hawai’i, and how does the small-island mentality work as double-edged sword?

SATURDAY, OCT 16
Talk Story Festival #22
all weekend, Craig Howes and Jon Osorio scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 16, 7 pm
See http://www.co.honolulu.hi.us/parks/programs/talkstory/index1.htm for more info

In “Take A Stand Stories,” The Value of Hawai’i co-editors share stories of two inspiring political and cultural leaders. Craig Howes tells of Joseph Nawahi, so desperate to vote in Hawai’i's last legislature before the overthrow that he left Hilo in a large rowboat. Craig directs the Center for Biographical Research at UH Manoa. Jon Osorio will talk about contemporary Hawaiians who have taken a stand. Jon is a Professor of Hawaiian Studies, historian, musician, and sovereignty activist.

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ABOUT THE BOOK:

The Value of Hawai`i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future
Edited by Craig Howes and Jon Osorio
A Biography Monograph, published by UH Press, July 2010

How did we get here? Three-and-a-half-day school weeks. Prisoners farmed out to the mainland. Tent camps for the migratory homeless. A blinkered dependence on tourism and the military for virtually all economic activity. The steady degradation of already degraded land. Contempt for anyone employed in education, health, and social service. An almost theological belief in the evil of taxes.

At a time when new leaders will be elected, and new solutions need to be found, the thirty-one contributors to The Value of Hawai`i outline the causes of our current state and offer points of departure for a Hawai`i-wide debate on our future.

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The Value of Hawai’i for SEPT 30

Aloha kakou,

Thanks to everyone who came out and supported the amazing We Value Hawai’i: Art/Music/Dialogue event on Saturday. The afternoon was full of people of all ages talking to each other, learning from each other, and making incredibly cool stuff–books, prints, buttons, videos, even bike lanes! And the art/literary/music/slam poetry/activist/nightlife/political scene came together full force for an incredible discussion from 6-8 pm on the topic of valuing the arts and education, with Kim Coco Iwamoto, Colleen Hanabusa, Neil Abercrombie, and Reps. Marcus Oshiro and Tom Brower.
Check out our facebook page:  “The Value of Hawai’i Discussion Group” for some photos.

How much can one book do? We’re not stopping in our determination to make these important community conversations happen, on all sorts of topics and all over Hawai’i (and online–follow us @valuehawaii #wevalueHI). This week we have two big events coming up, both free and open to the public:

The Value of Hawai’i Teach-In Series: An Introduction
SEPT 30, 12 noon to 1:10 pm
Kuykendall 410, UH Manoa
VH Teach-in Press Release
Value of Hawaii FINAL flier

We wanted to create a special opportunity for students, faculty, and other members of the UH Manoa community to meet and talk with contributors from the book. Nearly all of our writers have agreed to participate in this 5-week series, co-sponsored by the UHM Chancellor’s Office. The first session starts this Thursday, featuring CARLOS ANDRADE (Hawaiian Studies), TOM COFFMAN (Writer/Journalist/Filmmaker), CRAIG HOWES (Center for Biographical Research), and JON OSORIO (Hawaiian Studies). These four writers/thinkers/musicians have written The Value of Hawai’i essays titled “Haena,” “Reinventing Hawaii,” “an Introduction,” and “Hawaiian Issues,” respectively, and will speak on issues that range from Hawaiian sovereignty to the history of Hawai’i's statehood, vacation homes in Kauai to the power of music and olelo Hawai’i. Join us for an introduction and overview of the most-talked about book in Hawai’i. Bring your questions and thoughts with your brownbag lunch–our two contributors Carlos Andrade and  and two co-editors Craig Howes and Jon Osorio will be more than happy to listen and talk with you.


The Economy
SEPT 30, 7-8 pm
Ching Conference Center, Chaminade University

Worried talk of “the Economy” has settled over our state like a dark and ominous cloud that covers everyone and everything. That phrase works some powerful magic these days, but what are the real issues? And how does the economy effect other issues like education and government? Chaminade is also organizing a special series on The Value of Hawai’i, pairing contributors from the book with other perspectives from the community. On Thursday, Sumner La Croix (who wrote “The Economy” in our book) will be speaking alongside Paul Brewbaker (economist and Bank of Hawaii vice-president) and Scott Schroeder (Dean of Professional Studies at Chaminade). For a free excerpt of Sumner La Croix’s essay, please visit Civil Beat, at http://www.civilbeat.com/articles/2010/08/09/3392-the-value-of-hawaii-the-economy-by-sumner-la-croix/

Please see the attached fliers for more information on these two events, and the larger series each event is a part of. Save the dates!

If you haven’t seen the book yet, there are lots of free excerpts online, and more on the way. Check our website [http://thevalueofhawaii.com] for more details and our complete event calendar. Please help us get the word out about these events by forwarding this email to people and groups you think may be interested in talking about the current state of Hawai’i, and visions for our shared future. We look forward to seeing you again.

me ke aloha,
Aiko Yamashiro
Project Director for The Value of Hawai’i

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