The Value of Hawai‘i

News: News

“STREAMS”: Free Film Screening, Virtual Tour and Discussion — Thurs. Aug. 21, 6:30p at Kakaʻako Agora

Please join us next Thurs, Aug. 21 from 6:30 p at the Kakaʻako Agora for our latest collaboration: a FREE screening of Caroline Bâcle’s Lost Rivers, a presentation on some of Hawaiiʻ’s hidden streams and a discussion on the importance of fresh, flowing water led by Value of Hawai’i 2 contributor Sean Connelly! Details follow the poster.

 

For its inaugural event, 88 Block Walks—in collaboration with The Value of Hawaiʻi II and the Honolulu Museum of Art—is pleased to present a discussion of streams in Hawai‘i. Led by Sean Connelly, Walk #1: ‘Streams,’ is an examination of Honolulu’s channelized stream network.

Unbeknownst to many Honolulu residents, there is a stream that runs beneath Ward Warehouse and alongside the Farmers Market. This is only one of many cases of the urban environment systematically displacing a network of freshwater streams, springs, and ‘auwai. Yet, the water still flows from the mountains to the ocean in tunnels and ditches, hidden beneath roads and parking lots, between buildings and houses. Freshwater—our most valuable community resource—has become discarded, relegated to an ambiguous space. Can reclaiming our relationship with streams dramatically transform the way we live and value urban spaces?

A brief introduction of Hawai‘i’s displaced freshwater network, including a virtual tour of the stream flowing underneath Kakaʻako, will be followed by a screening of Caroline Bâcle’s Lost Rivers at Kakaʻako Agora. The event will conclude with a panel discussion of the history and future of streams, especially in regard to the redevelopment of the Kakaʻako neighborhood.

About the Film, Lost Rivers:
Lost Rivers is a portrait of “drainers” all over the world who explore the subterranean waterways in their cities in hopes of bringing them to the surface, both in terms of public access and ecological consciousness.

About The Value of Hawaiʻi:
The Value of Hawai‘i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions (UH Press, 2014) is a collection of essays and poetry that chart out alternative futures for Hawai‘i, grounded in community work and research happening in the present. The book offers wisdom, passion, and personal stories from both experienced and young leaders, all innovators in their fields, from O‘ahu, Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Lāna‘i, Moloka‘i, O‘ahu, Kaua‘i, and the Pacific. Our public programming is supported by The Center for Biographical Research and the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities.

About Sean Connelly
Sean Connelly is an interdisciplinary designer with a background in architecture and urban design. He is currently researching Hawaiian resource management and the roles of land development in watershed rehabilitation and the future of an ahupua‘a-based urbanism at Harvard University. On August 29 his installation, Land Division, will open at the Honolulu Museum of Art.

About 88 Block Walks:
A monthly series of walking tours and film screenings exploring the psychogeography of Kakaʻako.

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Na Hua Ea [hana hou!] Thursday, July 17th from 6pm at Nā Mea Hawai’i

Nā Hua Ea [hana hou performance!]
A community-building event in conjunction with ka Lā Ho’iho’i Ea
Thursday, July 17th, 2014
Nā Mea Hawai’i (Ward Warehouse, ‘Ewa end under Old Spaghetti Factory)
6:00 pm

Nā Hua Ea: Words of Genuine Security and Sovereignty

Poetry performances. Community discussion over ‘awa. Reports from the front line. Come learn, share and talk story about: current issues related to global militarization, Hawaiian independence, sacred spaces, & alternative futures for Hawai’i and the Pacific.

For 50 years from 1843-1893, ka Lā Ho’iho’i Ea celebrated Hawaiian national independence, and it was revived by a new generation of aloha ‘āina in 1985. We continue in this legacy of aloha ‘āina and join in building momentum toward this festive occasion. Join us in exploring the possibilities of genuine nation-building and genuine security in an evening filled with thought-provoking poetry and conversation about alternatives to increasing militarization and false forms of self-determination.

For more information, please contact: valueofhawaii2@gmail.com

This educational community event is sponsored by: The Value of Hawai‘i 2; Hui Mau ke Ea; Nā Mea Hawai’i; Women’s Voices Women Speak; MANA movement for aloha no ka ‘āina; Center for Biographical Research; and the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities

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Nā Hua Ea: Words of Genuine Sovereignty, This Wed July 2 in Heʻeia!

For a fun and inspiring night of sharing visions for sovereign Hawaiʻi, join us for Nā Hua Ea: Words of Genuine Security and Sovereignty, a community-building event in celebration of Hawaiian independence and visions for a demilitarized Oceania co-sponsored by the Value of Hawaiʻi 2!

When: Wed. July 2, 2014, 5:30 – 7:30pm
Where: Papahana Kuaola at 46 Haiku Rd, Kaneohe

What:  Poetry performances including Value of Hawaiʻi 2 contributors Dawn Mahi, Lyz Soto, No’u Revilla and Brandy McDougall. Community discussion over ‘awa. Reports from the front line and opportunities to organize around RIMPAC military exercises happening now; DOI hearings on Federal Recognition happening now; and over-development in Ko’olauloa happening now!Come join us to explore the possibilities of genuine nation-building and genuine security in an evening filled with thought-provoking poetry and conversation about alternatives to increasing militarization and false forms of self-determination. We invite you to come share in nā hua ea, words of genuine sovereignty.

This event kicks off a month-long celebration of ka Lā Hoʻihoʻi Ea.  For 50 years from 1843-1893, ka Lā Ho’iho’i Ea celebrated Hawaiian national independence. It was revived in 1985 by kanaka aloha ‘āina such as Kekuni Blaisdell and Imaikalani Kalahele. Hui Mau ke Ea continues in this legacy of aloha ‘āina and is sponsoring events throughout July in building momentum toward this festive occasion. The month of festivities will culminate in the annual celebration of ka Lā Hoʻihoʻi Ea at Thomas Square on Saturday, July 27 at noon.

Nā Hua Ea: Words of Genuine Security and Sovereignty is a free, public event. All are welcomed! Hui Mau ke Ea joins with co-sponsors: The Value of Hawaiʻi 2 hui, Papahana Kuaola, MANA movement for aloha no ka ʻāina, Womensʻ Voices Women Speak, The Center of Biographical Research and the Hawaii Council for the Humanities.

We greatly appreciate your kokua in posting the attached flyer and smaller image to your FB and/or Instagram to help us get the word out quickly and widely. Please spread the word! Mahalo!

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The Value of Hawaiʻi 2 Town Square Conversations

THE VALUE OF HAWAIʻI 2 TOWN SQUARE CONVERSATIONS

 

Thursday, June 26th, 5-6 pm
Ancestral Roots and Oceanic Visions
With The Value of Hawaiʻi 2 Co-editors Noelani Goodyear-Kaʻōpua and Aiko Yamashiro

 

Thursday, July 3rd, 5-6 pm
Visions for Pacific Islander Immigrants as Part of Hawai’i's Present and Future
With Innocenta Sound-Kikku, Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner and Kat Lobendahn

 

Thursday, July 10th, 5-6 pm
Island Style and Youth Activism
With John “Prime” Hina, James Koshiba and Lisa Grandinetti

 

Thursday, July 24th [rescheduled from July 17th], 5-6 pm
The Role of Spirituality in Community Building
With Hāwane Rios, Mark Patterson and Ashley Galacgac

 

Town Square, hosted and produced weekly by Beth-Ann Kozlovich, is one of the oldest of Hawaii Public Radio’s public affairs programs. Since its inception in 1999, Town Square has provided a lively forum for political, social, educational and cultural issues. While featuring round table discussion, listeners are also encouraged to ask questions and provide their own insights.

Please tune-in to the next four editions of HPR2’s Town Square, for a series of conversations that address how we might work together to create a better Hawaiʻi and assess the issues of Pacific Islander immigration, spirituality in community building and island-style activism amongst youths.

Our collaboration with Town Square starts this Thursday, June 26th and continues weekly through July 17th on 89.3 FM from 5:00 to 6:00 pm. Town Square may also be accessed live from the HPR2 website at http://hpr2.org/. For those interested in calling-in during the live show, please call 941-3689, or toll free 1-877-941-3689.

**The Value of Hawai’i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions (UH P, April 2014) is a collection
of essays, poetry, and artwork, asking: how can more of us protect and create waiwai, value, for
coming generations?

For more information about the book and any upcoming events, please visit us on the web:
http://tvoh.manoa.hawaii.edu/ or on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/valueofhawaii2. The Value of Hawai’i community programming is sponsored by The Center for Biographical Research and the Hawai’i Council for the Humanities.

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CONTACT x Value of Hawai’i 2 Dialogue: Monday, April 21, 6:30 – 8:00 pm

Honolulu Museum of Art School at Linekona, 1111 Victoria Street Honolulu, HI 96814.
Monday, April 21, 6:30pm – 8:00pm

Health and Inequality:
This dialogue with Joseph Keawe’aimoku Kaholokula will contemplate the many ways in which individual and family health are affected an in some cases, determined by larger societal forces. In addition, this ldialogue will remind us of the ways in which recovery of Hawaiian cultural practices can help to revitalize and healthily sustain all peoples in Hawai’i.

For more information visit http://www.honolulumuseum.org/art/exhibitions/14299-contact/
Phone inquiries can be directed to Maile Meyer at (808) 783-2786.

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Launch of The Value of Hawai‘i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions

Click here–> Value of Hawaii 2_Press Release for a press release for the new book. Go to the UH Press website, for purchasing information. And read the Table of Contents <– here.

Details on upcoming events may be found on the blog page of this website, as well as on facebook.

Email valueofhawaii2@gmail.com to be put on our announcement mailing list.

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October 2011 Children and Youth Day

We had a great time running a booth at the 2011 Children and Youth Day and asking kids to think about problems and solutions for Hawai‘i’s future. They took the challenge very seriously, and came up with some great visual arguments. Here are a few:

 

 

 

 

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‘The Future of Hawaii’ theme of this weekend’s Hawaii Book and Music Festival

6th Annual Hawaii Book and Music Festival

May 14-15, 2011
Honolulu Hale Civic Grounds
10 am to 5 pm
Free admission and parking

http://www.hawaiibookandmusicfestival.org/

Bring your family and friends and enjoy a full weekend of fine words, exciting music and performances, games, food, and important discussion! This year, the Hawaii Book and Music Festival is featuring a number of talks and activities inspired by The Value of Hawai’i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future. We are very pleased to be sharing with you some of our highlights for this weekend. For a full schedule of events and more information, go to http://www.hawaiibookandmusicfestival.org/

**Two full days of humanities discussion forums on the value and future of Hawai’i, and bringing together community and political leaders and scholars on a wide range of issues

Saturday–

Tourism: Frank Haas, Vicky Holt Takamine, Ramsay Remigius Mahealani Taum, Ron Williams

Education: Mark Matsuda, Lyla Berg, Phillip Bossert, Kim Coco Iwamoto

Economics: John Webster, Robbie Alm, Sumner La Croix, Dawn Webster

Social Services: Susan Chandler, Bob Nakata, Suzanne Chun-Oakland, Carol Plummer

Sovereignty: John D. Waihe’e, Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie, Jonathan K. Kamakawiwo’ole Osorio

Sunday–

Arts: Craig Howes, Marilyn Cristofori, Joe Rice, Michael Pili Pang, Kathryn Xian

Revising History: John Rosa, Noelani Arista, Tom Coffman, Sarah Vowell

The Land: Cristina Bacchilega, William Aila, Carlos Andrade, Alapa’i Nahale’a, Charles Reppun

Sustainable Community: Davianna Pomaika’i McGregor, Jon Matsuoka, Luciano Minerbi

Food: Wanda Adams, John Heckathorn, Ed Kenney, Gary Maunakea-Forth

Energy: Jay Fidell, Henry Curtis, Jeff Mikulina, Scott Seu

Transportation: Ikaika Hussey, Jay Fidell, Chad Taniguchi, Peter Vincent

**Public debut and demonstration of “Seeing the Value” card game, a unique visual card-discussion game developed and showcased by students at Mililani High School and teachers Claire Gearen and David Goldberg. This innovative interactive card game asks Hawai’i youth to explore the trade-offs of value in the issues that matter most to us. Students choose a current events issue, create an image, and argue for a positive or negative value in effecting that issue for Hawai‘i. See what others value and how your choices interact. See the value! Audience participants will also get an opportunity to add their own card ideas to the newly created deck. (Saturday and Sunday, 10 am to noon)

**Special talk by National Endowment for the Humanities Chair Jim Leach as part of his US-tour to call attention to the importance of “Civility in a Fractured Society.” “Civilization requires civility. Words matter.” Beyond the idea of simple etiquette, Leach will discuss the need for respectful engagement with other viewpoints and experiences during this tumultuous moment in history, and the special place that the humanities can create for truly civil discourse. (Saturday 4 pm)

**Performances and presentations by Youth Speaks Hawai’i on the topic of “Bridging Poetry and Politics.” These savvy young poets have been having heated discussions on what we value (and do not value) about Hawai’i, and will be sharing their courageous insight and imaginings with a poetic edge. (Saturday at noon, Sunday at 10am)

**Performance and discussions with amazing musicians, dancers, and theater groups, including Eddie and Myrna Kamae, Cyril Pahinui, The Royal Hawaiian Band, Monkey Waterfall, and many many more.

**Keiki storytelling and activities with a number of special guests, including PBS Kids characters, Jeff Gere, Maya Soetoro-Ng, and many more!

**Discussion sessions focused specifically on Hawaiian culture and history, and featuring a number of renowned experts and exciting new initiatives. Some of the topics and speakers include: Polynesian Voyaging Society (Nainoa Thompson), Mana Wahine (‘Oiwi 4 authors Alohalani Brown, Keahi Lee, No’ukahau’oli Revilla, Blaine Tolentino), Men in Hula (Robert Cazimero, Benton Sen, Burton White), The Strategy of Hawaiian Literacy and Newspapers (Puakea Nogelmeier, Kau’i Sai-Dudoit), and many more, including sessions on surfing, sumo, petroglyphs and ancient sites, and Hawaiian music.

**Last, but not least, featuring a number of talented and award-winning authors from Hawai’i and elsewhere, for discussions, on writing, publishing, and all the difficulty and joy of storytelling. Including James Rumford, Alexei Melnick, Maxine Hong-Kingston, Sarah Vowell, Bamboo Ridge #98 writers, local playwrights, and many more.

This listing only represents a small number of the many individuals, groups, programs, performances, and activities that will be a part of the Hawaii Book and Music Festival. For a full listing, check out their website at http://www.hawaiibookandmusicfestival.org/

Hope to see you there! And our thanks to the Hawai’i Council for the Humanities for the great work in helping put this together!

2011 Hawaii Book and Music Festival sponsored by

Bank of Hawaii, Hawaii Tourism Authority, City and Country of Honolulu, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Honolulu StarAdvertiser, KHON2, Hawai’i Council for the Humanities, Honolulu Magazine, Hagadone Printing Company, PBS Hawaii, PBS Kids, Clearchannel Radio, Visitor Video, Aqua Hotels and Resorts, Hawaiian Airlines, Booklines Hawaii, Hawaii Public Radio, and the Hawaii Independent.

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Join us at “Water Writes Hawaii”

The Value of Hawai‘i will have a booth at this great event on Thursday, July 7th. Come down and support a community artistic project on the importance of water!

The Estria Foundation and 808 Urban presents…

#WaterWrites Hawai’i

July 7th, 2011 from 4-7 p.m.

905 Kokea Street

Mauka of Honolulu Community College at

874 Dillingham Blvd.

The unveiling of the largest graffiti mural in the state of Hawaii. This is one of 10 murals being painted around the world, communicating the relationship between community and water. At the center of the mural sits a 25 foot tall portrait of Queen Lili’uokalani, representing her commitment to insure that water and land be declared a public trust to be cared for by all Hawaiians. The community is invited to join the artists in celebration of the completion of the mural. The event will feature cultural performers, artists, musicians, educational activities, vendor booths, lunch trucks, and a gathering of diverse community members joining together to celebrate the theme of the mural “ A ‘ohe hana nui ke alu ‘ia “ or “No task is too big when done together by all.”

FREE Parking at HCC, enter on Kokea St into Lot 1C

Guest Appearances By:

Gov. Neil Abercrombie

Michael T. Rota: HCC Chancellor

Vicki Holt Takamine’s Hula Halau, Pua Ali’i ‘Ilima

Palani Vaughan

Food trucks and vendors will on-site. Bring your keiki!

Please bring lawn chairs, hats, and sunblock.

This is an Eco-friendly event so bring your mess kit

For more information about the Honolulu Water Writes Project please contact Amanda Corby at (808) 783-1407

For more information about The Estria Foundation or the Water Writes Mural Series, please contact Nancypili@estria.org (510) 698-6640

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‘The Future of Hawaii’ theme of 2011 Hawaii Book and Music Festival

6th Annual Hawaii Book and Music Festival
May 14-15, 2011
Honolulu Hale Civic Grounds
10 am to 5 pm
Free admission and parking
http://www.hawaiibookandmusicfestival.org/

Bring your family and friends and enjoy a full weekend of fine words, exciting music and performances, games, food, and important discussion! This year, the Hawaii Book and Music Festival is featuring a number of talks and activities inspired by The Value of Hawai’i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future. We are very pleased to be sharing with you some of our highlights for this weekend. For a full schedule of events and more information, please visit their official website at http://www.hawaiibookandmusicfestival.org/

**Two full days of humanities discussion forums on the value and future of Hawai’i, and bringing together community and political leaders and scholars on a wide range of issues. Complete panel descriptions, speaker bios, and discussion questions can be found here: http://www.hawaiibookandmusicfestival.org/value-of-hawaii.pdf

Saturday–
Tourism: Frank Haas, Vicky Holt Takamine, Ramsay Remigius Mahealani Taum, Ron Williams
Education: Mark Matsuda, Lyla Berg, Phillip Bossert, Kim Coco Iwamoto
Economics: John Webster, Robbie Alm, Sumner La Croix, Dawn Webster
Social Services: Susan Chandler, Bob Nakata, Suzanne Chun-Oakland, Carol Plummer
Sovereignty: John D. Waihe’e, Brickwood Galuteria, Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie, Jonathan K. Kamakawiwo’ole Osorio

Sunday–
Arts: Craig Howes, Marilyn Cristofori, Joe Rice, Michael Pili Pang, Kathryn Xian
Revising History: John Rosa, Noelani Arista, Tom Coffman, Sarah Vowell
The Land: Cristina Bacchilega, William Aila, Carlos Andrade, Alapa’i Nahale’a, Charles Reppun
Sustainable Community: Davianna Pomaika’i McGregor, Jon Matsuoka, Luciano Minerbi
Food: Wanda Adams, John Heckathorn, Ed Kenney, Gary Maunakea-Forth
Energy: Jay Fidell, Henry Curtis, Jeff Mikulina, Scott Seu
Transportation: Ikaika Hussey, Jay Fidell, Chad Taniguchi, Peter Vincent

**Public debut and demonstration of “Seeing the Value” card game, a unique visual card-discussion game developed and showcased by students at Mililani High School and teachers Claire Gearen and David Goldberg. This innovative interactive card game asks Hawai’i youth to explore the trade-offs of value in the issues that matter most to us. Students choose a current events issue, create an image, and argue for a positive or negative value in effecting that issue for Hawai‘i. See what others value and how your choices interact. See the value! Audience participants will also get an opportunity to add their own card ideas to the newly created deck. (Saturday and Sunday, 10 am to noon)
**Special talk by National Endowment for the Humanities Chair Jim Leach as part of his US-tour to call attention to the importance of “Civility in a Fractured Society.” “Civilization requires civility. Words matter.” Beyond the idea of simple etiquette, Leach will discuss the need for respectful engagement with other viewpoints and experiences during this tumultuous moment in history, and the special place that the humanities can create for truly civil discourse. (Saturday 4 pm)

**Performances and presentations by Youth Speaks Hawai’i on the topic of “Bridging Poetry and Politics.” These savvy young poets have been having heated discussions on what we value (and do not value) about Hawai’i, and will be sharing their courageous insight and imaginings with a poetic edge.  (Saturday at noon, Sunday at 10am)

**Performance and discussions with amazing musicians, dancers, and theater groups, including Eddie and Myrna Kamae, Cyril Pahinui, The Royal Hawaiian Band, Monkey Waterfall, and many many more.

**Keiki storytelling and activities with a number of special guests, including PBS Kids characters, Jeff Gere, Maya Soetoro-Ng, and many more!

**Discussion sessions focused specifically on Hawaiian culture and history, and featuring a number of renowned experts and exciting new initiatives. Some of the topics and speakers include: Polynesian Voyaging Society (Nainoa Thompson), Mana Wahine (‘Oiwi 4 authors Alohalani Brown, Keahi Lee, No’ukahau’oli Revilla, Blaine Tolentino), Men in Hula (Robert Cazimero, Benton Sen, Burton White), The Strategy of Hawaiian Literacy and Newspapers (Puakea Nogelmeier, Kau’i Sai-Dudoit), and many more, including sessions on surfing, sumo, petroglyphs and ancient sites, and Hawaiian music.

**Last, but not least, featuring a number of talented and award-winning authors from Hawai’i and elsewhere, for discussions, on writing, publishing, and all the difficulty and joy of storytelling. Including James Rumford, Alexei Melnick, Maxine Hong-Kingston, Sarah Vowell, Bamboo Ridge #98 writers, local playwrights, and many more.

This listing only represents a small number of the many individuals, groups, programs, performances, and activities that will be a part of the Hawaii Book and Music Festival. For a full listing, check out their website at http://www.hawaiibookandmusicfestival.org/
Hope to see you there! And our thanks to the Hawai’i Council for the Humanities for the great work in helping put this together!

2011 Hawaii Book and Music Festival sponsored by
Bank of Hawaii, Hawaii Tourism Authority, City and Country of Honolulu, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Honolulu StarAdvertiser, KHON2, Hawai’i Council for the Humanities, Honolulu Magazine, Hagadone Printing Company, PBS Hawaii, PBS Kids, Clearchannel Radio, Visitor Video, Aqua Hotels and Resorts, Hawaiian Airlines, Booklines Hawaii, Hawaii Public Radio, and the Hawaii Independent.
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